as/above/so/below
tthoporngifs:

Courtney Cummz & Katja Kassin in ‘Club Katja’
TTHOPornGIFS.com
theacenightwatch:

classicdaisycalico:

thepyrobotsoul:

nutritionbeast:

This is what happens when a smoker quits. Pass it on.

This is so important

How does this not have more notes?! Seriously, take the time to read this because it could save a life. Or SEVERAL.

I like this better than the anti-smoking advertisements on TV that try to scare the shit out of you.

theacenightwatch:

classicdaisycalico:

thepyrobotsoul:

nutritionbeast:

This is what happens when a smoker quits. Pass it on.

This is so important

How does this not have more notes?! Seriously, take the time to read this because it could save a life. Or SEVERAL.

I like this better than the anti-smoking advertisements on TV that try to scare the shit out of you.

scinote:

The Placebo Effect: Cured by Your Cranium

When first described, the placebo effect sounds like something straight out of science fiction or maybe even magic. But it’s all proven science. This medical phenomenon occurs when a patient starts showing improvement without receiving a real treatment—either through having a fake one, like sugar pills or intravenous saline (salt water) in lieu of a drug, or through simply having faith in their healthcare provider. It actually happens quite a bit, serving as a testament to the power of the mind.
The placebo effect seems to work best for things that can be experienced more subjectively, like pain, depression or sedation. One study of patients with major depression found that some experienced similar (though not identical) changes in brain activity on placebo as on an antidepressant medication. Other studies showed that placebos could relieve pain through similar mechanisms as drugs like morphine—if naloxone (a drug that blocks opioid receptors) was administered, the placebo response went away. The response has also been shown to depend on what patients are told to expect—patients given a muscle relaxant actually felt more tense when told it was a stimulant, apparently due to not absorbing the drug as quickly as patients told it had sedating effects. A recent and fascinating study even showed that patients could show improvement when told they were taking a placebo—provided it was explained to them that the placebo effect worked.
What’s the basis behind this? One explanation deals with the consequences of expectancy, noting that patients who think they will get better tend to feel less stress and anxiety (which can dampen immune response) and tend to become more active, which can distract them from pain. Another explanation calls upon classical conditioning, where pairing a stimulus that causes a response (eg, a painkiller for a headache) with a neutral stimulus (eg, the sugar coating on the pill) can then lead to that neutral stimulus causing a similar response (eg, a sugar pill reducing the pain of a headache.) This sort of process has been well-documented in humans and in animals.
To read more, please click on the picture above.
What do you think about the basis of the placebo effect? Have you ever experienced the placebo effect? Let us know by reblogging or commenting on this post.

Submitted by herd-effect
Edited by Peggy K. 

scinote:

The Placebo Effect: Cured by Your Cranium

When first described, the placebo effect sounds like something straight out of science fiction or maybe even magic. But it’s all proven science. This medical phenomenon occurs when a patient starts showing improvement without receiving a real treatment—either through having a fake one, like sugar pills or intravenous saline (salt water) in lieu of a drug, or through simply having faith in their healthcare provider. It actually happens quite a bit, serving as a testament to the power of the mind.

The placebo effect seems to work best for things that can be experienced more subjectively, like pain, depression or sedation. One study of patients with major depression found that some experienced similar (though not identical) changes in brain activity on placebo as on an antidepressant medication. Other studies showed that placebos could relieve pain through similar mechanisms as drugs like morphine—if naloxone (a drug that blocks opioid receptors) was administered, the placebo response went away. The response has also been shown to depend on what patients are told to expect—patients given a muscle relaxant actually felt more tense when told it was a stimulant, apparently due to not absorbing the drug as quickly as patients told it had sedating effects. A recent and fascinating study even showed that patients could show improvement when told they were taking a placeboprovided it was explained to them that the placebo effect worked.

What’s the basis behind this? One explanation deals with the consequences of expectancy, noting that patients who think they will get better tend to feel less stress and anxiety (which can dampen immune response) and tend to become more active, which can distract them from pain. Another explanation calls upon classical conditioning, where pairing a stimulus that causes a response (eg, a painkiller for a headache) with a neutral stimulus (eg, the sugar coating on the pill) can then lead to that neutral stimulus causing a similar response (eg, a sugar pill reducing the pain of a headache.) This sort of process has been well-documented in humans and in animals.

To read more, please click on the picture above.

What do you think about the basis of the placebo effect? Have you ever experienced the placebo effect? Let us know by reblogging or commenting on this post.

Submitted by herd-effect

Edited by Peggy K. 

sushinfood:

vvankinq:

this is fucked up. this fucked me up. the teachers fucked up by not showing us this fuck up. fuck.

dear god

i’m 28 and never knew this

janicexxx:

What you know about that deepthroat though?

janicexxx:

What you know about that deepthroat though?

lilhuntychild:

this dog is cute but he has been used for evil

tomasorban:

30-5-14 /
my reinterpretation of the picture ive found here
+ basic yellowless version

tomasorban:

30-5-14 /

my reinterpretation of the picture ive found here

+ basic yellowless version

perpetual-loop:

Mellon MS 45: Alchemy, in German. Unsigned, ca. 1610. f. 45v, 46r : Geometric symbols containing luna crests. Beinecke Library, Yale.

rufffn:

I will always reblog this

rufffn:

I will always reblog this

ordocadavercyan:

Печать планетарной иерархии.

ordocadavercyan:

Печать планетарной иерархии.